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Corporate Elder Connection Information Card 



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Why should corporations be concerned with caregiving issues?

While corporations across the United States are becoming increasingly concerned with caregiving issues, our focus is on Pinellas County, Florida. In addition to having the largest total population of those over age 60, Pinellas County ranks fourth in density of elderly residents among Florida's 67 counties. Pinellas also ranks fourth in the state regarding the number of residents with Alzheimer's: 34,000 (Florida Department of Elder Affairs, 2004).

How Employers are Affected
Despite the widely held belief that people with Alzheimer's reside in nursing homes, most live at home with family caregivers. A National Alliance for Caregiving AARP survey indicates:

  • 23.2% of all households are involved in caregiving
  • 64.2% of caregivers are employed

Therefore, caregiving has a direct impact on employee productivity.

  • Approximately 54 million Americans in the work force care for chronically ill relatives -- a responsibility that often conflicts with work.
  • Between 10% and 31% of working caregivers leave their jobs as the result of caregiving; some elect to retire early, while others leave their jobs altogether.

The National Caregiver Survey (The MetLife Study of Employer Costs for Working Caregiver, 1997) estimates the loss of work experienced by U.S. employees caring for an aging relative or cognitively impaired adult costs between $11 and $29 billion per year. More recently, a U.S. Senate report echoed these findings, stating that the direct impact to community employers for replacement costs, absenteeism costs, and costs due to elder care is approximately $11 billion annually (June 2004, U.S. Senate Committee on Aging).

Now is the time ...
With the first wave of America's 76 million baby boomers turning 65, now is the time to address these issues. By joining together, community providers, employers, and caregivers can find positive solutions to meet the current and pending increase in demand for elder care services/support. Neighborly Care Network plans to be a leader in our community's preparation to meet these needs.


Why should corporations be concerned with caregiving issues?

Because they can't afford not to!

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Objectives of Corporate Elder Connection Program Minimize
1.  Help caregivers remain employed

2.  Provide respite care for caregivers of Alzheimer's and other dementias, stroke patients, and others managing chronic illinesses

3.  Educate and increase awareness of community resources to assist caregivers and those with long-term incapacitating illnesses

4.  Assist employers with the development of a corporate culture sensitive to elder care issues



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Who is eligible for the Corporate Elder Connection Program? Minimize

Any employer in Pinellas County, Florida, and their employees will be eligible to participate in Neighborly's Corporate Elder Connection (CEC) program. The CEC will provide:

  • Counseling and support to working caregivers who are caring for an elderly relative at home
  • Adult day care services to frail elderly individuals over the age of 60 who have one or more of the following:
    • health issues
    • physical impairments
    • a diagnosis of dementia
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For more information, call Marsha Coke at 727-573-9444 Minimize

Marsha Coke, Director of Adult Day Services

Marsha Coke, director of the Neighborly Care Network Adult Day Services and Nutrition programs, has more than 20 years' experience working with the elderly and their families. She has a background in dementia-related disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. Marsha is experienced in support group facilitation and public speaking, and is a caregiver for her own mother.

Marsha has a bachelor's degree in organizational studies and a master's in organizational management.

Marsha Coke, Director of Adult Day Services

Marsha Coke, director of the Neighborly Care Network Adult Day Services and Nutrition programs, has more than 20 years' experience working with the elderly and their families. She has a background in dementia-related disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. Marsha is experienced in support group facilitation and public speaking, and is a caregiver for her own mother.

Marsha has a bachelor's degree in organizational studies and a master's in organizational management.

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